Take Flight in Ultrawings on December 19 for PS VR

It’s been a fairly long flight (See what I did there?) getting Ultrawings ready for PS VR, but that day is finally here.

Mark December 19th, 2017 on your calendars (yes, only a few days away) as that’s the day you’ll be flying the Ultralight, rocket-powered Glider, Sport Plane, and Gee Racer across an island-themed world we hand built for this game and you.

Also, Ultrawings launches both in North America and European territories simultaneously. Thanks, Sony, for making this a reality!

For those not in the know, Ultrawings is an open-world, flight game where you pilot multiple aircraft to complete a variety of missions across an island-themed world.

What kind of missions?

You’ll fly through score rings, pop balloons with a dart gun, perform spot landings, take pictures using your fully working tablet, participate in air races, and much more. A simple flying game this is not.

How are you going to fly these awesome aircraft?

You can choose to play with your standard DualShock 4 but, for those pilots that want an even more immersive flight game, you’ll want to break out your PlayStation Moves (you’ll need 2 of them) and use your virtual hands to grab and manipulate the flight stick, buttons, and switches.

Additionally, it’s worth mentioning that Ultrawings is a flight game with real progression and rewarding challenges to overcome. As you complete missions you’ll earn money and, in turn, you’ll spend that money on new airports and new aircraft. We estimate it takes an average pilot around 15 hours just to complete the missions and double (or even triple) that to get a gold medal on all of them (and yes there is a Trophy for that!).

Finally, we love feedback so if you run into any issues or have any questions please let us know.

P.S. Many thanks to our fans who have waited patiently for the release!

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FUTmas is Back in FIFA 18 Ultimate Team

The most wonderful time of the year in FIFA Ultimate Team (FUT) is back! Whether you have been naughty or nice, enjoy FUTmas this holiday season with a variety of SBCs, themed Weekly Objectives, special holiday offers, and much more.

Starting on Friday, December 15, log in to FIFA 18 Ultimate Team on PlayStation 4 to discover new FUT content, available for a limited time.

New and fan favorite Squad Building Challenges (SBCs) will be released throughout the event, including FUTmas Countdown SBCs. As part of the Countdown, three player challenges will be released every day from December 15 until December 24, only available for 24 hours.

Spread FUTmas cheer throughout the week by completing a variety of themed weekly objectives to unwrap great rewards. And check your FUTmas stockings throughout the week for exclusive, limited-time holiday offers sure to make you jolly.

Finally, don’t miss another chance to get your FUT squad in the holiday spirit by picking up three unique FUTmas kits that can be earned using different methods–be sure to log in to FUT all week to find out how.

What is FUT?

FIFA Ultimate Team (FUT) is the most popular mode in FIFA, played by millions all over the world every day. FUT lets you build your dream FIFA squad from scratch and compete with it in a variety of single player and online modes.

How Do I Get Started in FUT?

When you go to the Ultimate Team tab in FIFA 18, you’ll begin your FUT journey by receiving a starter pack containing enough player items to fill out your starting XI, followed by your choice of a loan player item that can only be used in a limited number of matches. To help customize your squad, you’ll also choose from a selection of real-world home and away kits and club badges.

How Do I Improve My FUT Squad?

If your team isn’t full of stars right out of the gate, Ultimate Team provides plenty of ways to improve it — some easy and quick, others that challenge you in exchange for better rewards. Completing a variety of in-game objectives*, as well as playing in matches, are the best ways to earn these rewards. Rewards can be FUT Coins, digital packs filled with player and consumable items, or a combination of both. Once you earn enough Coins, you can use them to buy more packs from the store or bid on players on the FUT transfer market.

REQUIRES FIFA 18 ON PLAYSTATION 4 (SOLD SEPARATELY), ALL GAME UPDATES, INTERNET CONNECTION, AND EA ACCOUNT TO PLAY. NOT ALL FEATURES AVAILABLE ON ALL PLATFORMS. PLEASE VISIT https://www.easports.com/fifa/features FOR DETAILS. © 2017 Electronic Arts Inc. EA, EA SPORTS, the EA SPORTS logo and Ultimate Team are trademarks of Electronic Arts Inc. Official FIFA licensed product. © FIFA and FIFA’s Official Licensed Product Logo are copyrights and/or trademarks of FIFA. All rights reserved. Manufactured under license by Electronic Arts Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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How Russell Walks Created a Star Wars Battlefront II PS4 Theme

I made my first Star Wars drawing – in ballpoint pen on the back of an envelope – immediately after seeing Star Wars: A New Hope. It was a portrait of Luke Skywalker. Or it may have been Han Solo. Some areas around the chin looked sort of like Greedo. Honestly, it wasn’t very good, but that didn’t matter, because for the few minutes I was drawing, I was off-world, on the Death Star, shooting at stormtroopers and saving a princess. In the years since that first drawing, I’ve been creating work based on science-fiction and pop-culture for some of the most well-known companies in the world. I’ve probably drawn Luke Skywalker about a thousand times. And still, every single time the pencil hits the paper and another Star Wars drawing begins, the same sense of wonder and magic come back to me.

I was incredibly excited when the opportunity of creating a Star Wars Battlefront II inspired PlayStation theme was presented to me and had all sorts of ideas as to what could be done. In my mind I was looking for color, for action, and for a sort of “retro/propaganda” feeling, and I believe that comes across nicely in the work.

To take you behind the creative process here is that path I take on a project like this. First I spend a couple of days doing research – I’m sometimes looking for images of the characters I’ll be depicting, but I also spend time just checking out art, sort of free associating and following whatever trail the web lays out for me. In this instance, I started by looking at vintage racing posters, WPA artwork from the 30’s, and street art created by folks like Banksy and Shepard Fairey. This an important step. Inspiration is a collaborative process, and seeing what others have done almost always gives me an idea or ignites a spark in the creative part of my mind.

After I create my initial comps and share them with the group involved in the project, I sit at home in my darkened studio, convincing myself that everything I do sucks, and that at some point in the next few days, I’ll get an email firing me. (Luckily, that hasn’t happened yet, but I still get the same butterflies every single time.) I usually send a couple of ideas, and after one is selected, I begin revising, incorporating suggestions and tightening up areas that could stand to be improved. In this instance, I spent most of my time revising Iden’s face, moving from an angular interpretation to something more feminine. It was also at this stage that I decided to drop the gun and add Iden’s droid, ID10. Ultimately ending up arriving at what you can download today for free!

Although it was important to me that the pieces I created focused on Iden, my initial comps included some hints to the other characters she would encounter in her journey. Then, as I worked, and learned more about Iden’s importance in the giant, sprawling story of Star Wars, I decided that she deserved some time to herself, and dropped the supporting characters, with the exception of ID9. Additionally, while my initial intent was to depict Iden helmeted, I sort of fell under Janina Gavankar’s spell – Her enthusiasm and excitement are contagious, and entirely evident on her face. I thought it might be cool to show that, particularly since the Battlefront II story isn’t only about laser blasts and lightsabers. It’s also about doing the right thing, and finding the courage to act in the face of overwhelming odds. Ultimately, Iden’s story is also about finding her humanity, and I thought the best way to show that would be to simply show her face.

Star Wars Battlefront IIStar Wars Battlefront II

My initial attempts. It’s obvious something’s missing here. There’s no sense of immediacy, no “Call To Action”. There’s no movement here, and the viewer is on the outside looking in. Finally, the focus is barely on Iden.

These are like appetizers at a chain restaurant: They’re not very good, but they at least make you hungry enough to try something else.

Star Wars Battlefront II

Creating this piece reinforced my contention that, at least with our initial work, the best idea would be to concentrate entirely on Iden. I like this image, but, ultimately, the story we’re telling is Iden’s, and I wanted the focus to be entirely on her.

Star Wars Battlefront II

I’m on the right track here, but I don’t like either the composition or my color choices. It also occurred to me around this point that I should include another element.

Star Wars Battlefront II

So close! I don’t like the angularity here, though, nor the fact that the composition is basically the same as the other piece. It was easy to soften her face, but the compositional aspect had me stumped. Then, sometime around 2am, as I was playing the game, inspiration slapped me on the back of the head, and it occurred to me how much sense it made to drop the gun and add ID10.

Star Wars Battlefront II

I STILL felt like the backgrounds were too complicated. Dropping the third color simplified things, and I finally felt like I had achieved my goal.

I usually get the question of “Do you have an all-time favorite Star Wars poster from one of the films?”

Well I have a few!I absolutely love Drew Struzan and Charles White’s “Circus” poster. I also dig Kazuhiro Sano’s one-sheet for Return Of The Jedi, and Drew’s “Special Edition” triptych.

I look at these pieces over and over, and while they are inspiring, I don’t look for elements from them to include in my work. It’s more accurate to say that these pieces, and many, many others inspire me to do my best, and to find a new/different way of looking at a property so many of us love. It’s not a stretch at all to say that Star Wars changed my life, and if you told twelve-year-old me that this is what grown-up me would be doing for living – creating artwork for a Star Wars game! – twelve-year-old me would probably have a heart attack. Doing this is hard work, no doubt, but it’s also fulfilling, and rewarding, and most days – when I’m deep in the heart of a single-player campaign, for instance, and I’m laughing in amazement at how freaking cool Battlefront II is – I can’t believe how lucky I am.

-Russell

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PlayStation Blogcast 273: Donuts and Jedi

We had a great time at PSX 2017, but there’s no time to rest! We’re back this week with interviews on Firewall: Zero Hour and Donut County, as well as an extensive discussion on why you never show the monster in a horror movie. Plus: Final Fantasy recommendations, the Harry Potter mythos, and so much more. Enjoy the show!

Subscribe via iTunes, Spotify, Google or RSS, or download here

Stuff We Talked About

  • Firewall: Zero Hour
  • Donut County
  • Final Fantasy
  • Harry Potter
  • The Alien Series
  • The Last Jedi

Recent Episodes


The Cast

Official PlayStation Blogcast: Sid ShumanOfficial PlayStation Blogcast: Ryan ClementsOfficial PlayStation Blogcast: Kristen Titus

Sid Shuman – Director of Social Media, SIEA
Ryan Clements – Sr. Social Media Specialist, SIEA
Kristen Titus – Social Media Specialist, SIEA


Send us questions and tips! blogcast@sony.com
Leave us a voicemail! (650) 288-6706

Thanks to Cory Schmitz for our beautiful logo and Dormilón for our rad theme song and show music.

[Editor’s note: PSN game release dates are subject to change without notice. Game details are gathered from press releases from their individual publishers and/or ESRB rating descriptions.]

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InnerSpace Launches on PS4 January 16, 2018

We are happy to announce that InnerSpace is coming to PS4 on January 16! To commemorate our first game, we’re debuting our launch trailer, “Into the Inverse.” Enjoy the flight!

What is InnerSpace? On the surface, it’s an exploration flying game set in the Inverse, a universe of inside-out planets. Thematically, much of InnerSpace’s story is about cause and effect. You come into the world at the tail end of civilization, and the ruins here tell an ancient story. Why is the world this way? How did it get this way? As the Cartographer, it’s your job to find out.

Innerspace

InnerspaceInnerspace

This isn’t quite a post-apocalyptic setting, of scorched earth and radiation. It has maintained its beauty in its decay. Some ruins remain, and life, as it tends to do, still lingers. The landscapes have a story to tell, deliberately designed to hold true to the history of this place. It’s a colorful puzzle of sky and water, in the shadows of ancient gods, and we hope you enjoy putting the pieces together. If you believe something you see has meaning, it was most likely intentional.

So, when you hop into InnerSpace, I hope you question everything you see. This world is open to interpretation, and every experience will be different. When in doubt, just keep flying, and the secrets of the Inverse will reveal themselves.

Innerspace

Thanks for reading, and from all of us at PolyKnight Games, we hope you check out InnerSpace on January 16. Your greatest journey is within!

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InnerSpace Launches on PS4 January 16, 2018

We are happy to announce that InnerSpace is coming to PS4 on January 16! To commemorate our first game, we’re debuting our launch trailer, “Into the Inverse.” Enjoy the flight!

What is InnerSpace? On the surface, it’s an exploration flying game set in the Inverse, a universe of inside-out planets. Thematically, much of InnerSpace’s story is about cause and effect. You come into the world at the tail end of civilization, and the ruins here tell an ancient story. Why is the world this way? How did it get this way? As the Cartographer, it’s your job to find out.

Innerspace

InnerspaceInnerspace

This isn’t quite a post-apocalyptic setting, of scorched earth and radiation. It has maintained its beauty in its decay. Some ruins remain, and life, as it tends to do, still lingers. The landscapes have a story to tell, deliberately designed to hold true to the history of this place. It’s a colorful puzzle of sky and water, in the shadows of ancient gods, and we hope you enjoy putting the pieces together. If you believe something you see has meaning, it was most likely intentional.

So, when you hop into InnerSpace, I hope you question everything you see. This world is open to interpretation, and every experience will be different. When in doubt, just keep flying, and the secrets of the Inverse will reveal themselves.

Innerspace

Thanks for reading, and from all of us at PolyKnight Games, we hope you check out InnerSpace on January 16. Your greatest journey is within!

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How The Inpatient Turns Your Own Senses Against You

As a kid, I couldn’t walk past a line of railings without running my fingers along them. It’s a tendency I still lean towards today an adult, grazing my hand along walls, fences; coarse or smooth, touch reinforces my awareness of the world. Sometimes I feel more than any other of the five senses, somatosensation ties me most strongly to my surroundings.

Smell and taste can transport me elsewhere, my vision can trick me into seeing things that don’t exist. Sounds are open to interpretation. Touch, though? That’s my link to here and now. To what’s real.

And in upcoming PS VR game The Inpatient, it’s what I use to ground myself, thanks to just one of the subtle but distinct details creator Supermassive Games has developed. I recently visited Supermassive Games and was privy to a new portion of the game. I found myself in a tiny cell for most of my play session, and for all the horrors – both everyday and fantastical – I witness, I find odd comfort in reaching out and touching the nearest wall. The tactile feedback in my PS Move controller generates a sensory solidity that feels, well, real.

“We use the velocity of the objects involved to tailor the vibration to your expectation,” explains game director Nik Bowen of the fine-tuning his team has done to the controller’s gyro-functionality. “This is why running your hand against a wall feels drastically different to punching it – it’s amazingly realistic.”

After a quarter of an hour in the horror house that is Blackwood, I concur. And it doesn’t matter whether you use twin PS Move controllers or a DualShock 4 — you’ll feel like you’re there.

And there’s plenty of feedback to experience. Even my simple cell (with its locked door and barred windows, ‘cell’ rather than ‘hospital room’ is the word that springs to mind in describing my environment) is littered with objects to interact with. Mugs, light switches, books. Be it flipping paper over to read a doctor’s scribbled notes or gripping a sandwich with both virtual hands, the motion is as instinctive as it is pleasurable — though, sadly, I couldn’t swipe a sammie from my cell-mate’s/fellow patient’s clutches.

The Inpatient for PS VR

Not everything is tailored to unravelling the mysteries of Blackwood. “This is something we were very mindful of,” Bowen responds when asked if the heightened interactivity users experience with PS VR dictated how populated the world was with objects. But investigation isn’t just cursory. Examining whatever you can get your hands on (“We kept objects you can interact with within easy reach.”) is important. Some items will trigger memories.

These items and memories will aid you in solving the puzzles of the sanatorium’s recent history and the reasons for your current incarceration. But you don’t have to see to absorb; cocking your head to one side will help you hear snippets of conversation as staff pass by your door. Sound plays its part too.

In fact, Bowen stresses that The Inpatient’s audio is critical to the experience. Binaural audio, which gives players a sense of where sounds originate from in a 3D space, makes perfect sense for a game that plays (or preys) on players’ perceptions. Bowen states that the studio plans to “inform and unsettle” with the soundscape shifting between noises that are easily explainable, such as the skin-crawling scuttling of insects, and those that are not as you’re forced into situations that feel and sound like a living nightmare.

The Inpatient for PS VR

“The dreams that feature in the game are some of the richest in terms of awesome audio effects,” Bowen says, taking care not to delve into too much detail for fear of spoilers. The studio layers multiple natural sounds to add an edge of creepiness. I can attest to their effectiveness: weeks on, I’m still trying to isolate what normal audio was combined to make the stomach-dropping sound of a person’s neck being unnaturally twisted to make their head face me.

Even mundane objects take on a distorted, unsettling tone in these dreamscapes, making me question whether I’m asleep or stuck in a living nightmare. Supermassive Games won’t tell me. I reach out and touch a wall to test my theory that I’m simply lost in a vivid, horrifying dream. A harsh vibration rattles up my arm. Touch tells me this is all too real. Discordant sounds that are starting to echo louder in my ears make me too terrified to close my eyes. My senses are being turned against me… which is exactly what Supermassive wants. And I’ll have to wait until January 23, 2018 to find out whether there’s any escape.

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Regalia: Royal Edition — A European Tactical JRPG Coming to PS4

“Why make a JRPG? You’re not Japanese!”

Well, truthfully, our driving goal behind Regalia has always been to create a game in the vein of all the JRPGs we have loved throughout the years, from the Final Fantasy games of our childhood to modern day Persona titles.

Regalia draws inspiration from JRPG classics, but also delivers a modern mix of good old adventuring and dynamic storytelling. It’s a tactical RPG, but it’s actually a game about the restoration of your kingdom, bonding with vibrant characters met during your journey, embarking on the quirkiest quests possible, and bringing back your best JRPG moments in a modern, accessible style.

It can also be a game about unforgettable, rewarding combat and well thought-out tactics, but that’s for the player to decide – you can always tone down the difficulty level or even skip a battle if you can’t wait to see what other plot twists lay before you.

Regalia: Royal Edition

Skipping battles won’t make your problems go away, though – there’s always something to be done in Ascalia. Deal with your teammates’ dilemmas, such as Theo’s blood aversion, which is a strange problem for a vampire, though maybe not surprising given he dreams of being a hairdresser; or Esther’s tendency to make an atomic bomb with a few gears and spare parts. Oh, and don’t forget about fishing!

Setting out on our journey, we believed a JRPG is not so much about the country of origin, but a style – and we still believe that now, if not even more so. Both the Baldur’s Gate and Final Fantasy series are undeniably what one would consider role-playing games, but it is also clear that they represent very different approaches to the concept. A typical game made in the West has different design sensibilities than one made in the East.

Regalia: Royal Edition

Equally driven by nostalgia, personal tastes, and bravado, we chose the latter.

When you’re an indie studio like ours, with six or seven friends on the project at a time, some difficulties are to be expected. Indeed, to us, the development process was a journey of pain and discovery (mostly pain, though!). For one, we would quickly learn that our initial “let’s just create a JRPG” approach was neither productive nor very satisfying. It’s one thing to nail the required look and feel, to capture that specific quality which represents the J in JRPG… and then comes the time when you realize that’s not enough. You still have to infuse your creation with its own identity, all without compromising that central “love letter” principle. You need to make it more than the sum of its parts.

In other words, while we certainly didn’t set out to change the gaming world, we also didn’t want to make our game entirely derivative of the creations we looked up to. For example, as fans of Persona series, we loved the idea of building character relationships. However, that inspiration did not bar our wish to include some of our favorite things from beyond the Japanese end of the spectrum.

We wanted a touch of Discworld-esque humor paired with a robust approach to lore writing and worldbuilding. We wanted an in-game lore Codex, English voice acting, and so on. We wanted our game to be a familiar yet distinct blend. We had to make it enjoyable in its celebration of its roots, but shed off the elements that didn’t ever do much short of annoying us. This time around we were the creators, finally free to lose some of the dreaded mechanics… and story cliches.

Regalia: Royal Edition

We never wanted Regalia to be a game about brooding youths saving the world, nor an exercise in monologues about fiddles and personal torment. It was meant to be a smaller, light-hearted story that could spoof thousands of similar stories, a creature that the late, great Sir Terry Pratchett would have called “a world and mirror of worlds” – a homage without all the unbound excess. We knew Regalia needed a distinct identity, and that was exactly it.

So, yeah. Our game both is and isn’t a JRPG. It’s a creature of its own. It’s got its own flavor and charm. Like New York pizza that would not have come to be if it wasn’t for its Italian ancestry, but stands well enough on its own and is loved for what it is, not for where its roots go.

Making Regalia was certainly a blast. Seeing our game making its way to where it belongs – to PlayStation, to find its place alongside all these wonderful games, classic and new, that made us who we are and made Regalia what it is – now, that’s a moment of pure bliss.

We hope you’ll feel a great deal of that joy as you play, too!

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Bringing Star Wars: The Last Jedi to Star Wars Battlefront II

This is a pretty special week for Star Wars fans, isn’t it? Star Wars: The Last Jedi hits theaters worldwide on Friday, and Star Wars Battlefront II The Last Jedi Season is available today, free* for all players. Jump into the game and you’ll be able to play as Finn and Captain Phasma in multiplayer, try out new starships and vehicles, and explore the rise of The First Order in new chapters of the single-player in Star Wars Battlefront II: Resurrection.

Two locations from the films are included: D’Qar, a Starfighter Assault map set in space above a Resistance base, and a Galactic Assault battle on Crait. If you’ve seen any of the Star Wars: The Last Jedi trailers, you’ll recognize Crait immediately – it’s the one with the ski speeders kicking up red dirt and the massive AT-M6 walkers marching into battle. Yeah, that one.

Star Wars Battlefront II: The Last Jedi season

What is it like to bring a location like this to life? Two developers weighed in, explaining the process.

“It’s a daunting task,” said Paul Keslin, Producer on Star Wars Battlefront II. “Since we’re taking inspiration from a movie that is actively being worked on, we need to work very closely with Lucasfilm on getting things right. Some of those things are obvious, like having giant AT-M6’s running through the level; but some of them are a bit more subtle, as in getting the proper type of rocks in the right spot on the map.”

Star Wars Battlefront II: The Last Jedi seasonStar Wars Battlefront II: The Last Jedi season

Star Wars Battlefront II: The Last Jedi season

But there’s more to it than nailing the look – you also need to hit that feeling. “Mainly, it’s about making sure we provide an authentic feeling of being on Crait,” Keslin explained. “And helping you play out a scenario that reminds you of Star Wars: The Last Jedi.”

Peter Vesti Frendrup, Game Designer on Star Wars Battlefront II, said that working on Crait was both very exciting and very challenging. “Exciting because working with Lucasfilm on a new Star Wars location is the stuff of dreams and challenging because, for a level designer, a completely flat map with no cover is the stuff of nightmares. In the end, however, I think we found a great balance that is both true to the Star Wars universe, as well as fun to play.”

As a bonus for the PlayStation nation, in celebration of this awesome week of Star Wars with The Last Jedi movie and free Season 1 content, we have two exclusive Star Wars Battlefront II themes that are available now for free download. One showcases the incredible detail of the Star Wars Battlefront II game art. The second, named Iden Theme, is a piece inspired by the challenges Iden faces in the game’s single player campaign.

Ready to check it out? All Star Wars Battlefront II players can jump in right now – we can’t for you to see it for yourself.

*Requires Star Wars Battlefront II on applicable platform (sold separately), all game updates, internet connection, EA account, and PlayStation Plus membership (each sold separately).

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Roguelite Platformer Xenon Valkyrie+ Lands on PS Vita Next Week

Hi! I’m Fabrice, French solo developer of the adventure game Demetrios.

A few months ago, I was contacted by a Spanish developer named Daniel Fernandez Chavez. He noticed I was able to develop Demetrios for the PS4 and Vita on my own and was interested in having his own game, Xenon Valkyrie, ported to consoles. Specifically, he wanted it running on his favorite: PS Vita.

I agreed to the job, and thus, unexpectedly became a publisher!

Xenon Valkyrie+ combines the Roguelite and Platformer genres with RPG elements. Talk to characters, level up by killing monsters in randomly-generated dungeons, and find items and secrets to help you in your quest!

This isn’t a game for casual gamers. Most notably, it has perma-death. If you hit a game over, you lose everything collected during that run (experience levels, items…) with the exception of your Teamerites, a currency obtained from key actions (such as beating bosses) which can be used to unlock weapons in the hub store.

Combining your experiences during each run with a bit of persistence, each playthrough should bring you closer to the ending – or should I say, multiple endings! With three characters to choose from and several paths possible, including secret stages and hard-as-hell bosses, let’s just say that Platinum Trophy will be very tough to get!

The game features 90’s-style pixel art and quality chiptune music from Giorgiost (Jorge Olivares) for a retro feel. We’ve fully translated it into five languages (English, French, Spanish, German and Italian.)

As the game was created using GameMaker Studio, Xenon Valkyrie was easy to port to handheld. The Vita port is running in the full, original resolution (stretched to fit the new screen) at a smooth 60 FPS.

But this isn’t just a port! This build incorporates a large number of improvements over the original PC version, taking into account all the player feedback from the original release. These updates are why we decided to rename this version Xenon Valkyrie+. The PS Vita build incorporates gameplay enhancements including a dedicated button for each weapon (instead of scrolling between each) for a very fluid experience.

Xenon Valkyrie+ for PS Vita will be available December 19, 2017 at PlayStation Store, and it will be compatible with PlayStation TV.

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